04 Jun 2013

Citizenship and Identity in Iraq

Tuesday, 04 June 2013
(0 votes)
Historic Mesopotamia is home to an extraordinary range of religious and ethnic groups, which include, but are not limited to, Baha’is, Jews, Yazidis, Circassians, Faili Kurds, and Turkmen. While Iraq has undergone various political changes over the years, the ways by which these groups relate to one another, as well as their role in official discourse, have also fluctuated. Recently, differences among the various cultural, ethnic, and religious identities in Iraq have been adumbrated not only to explain conflict, but also to justify policy. Sectarianism as a concept of an unavoidable evil in everyday life, has substituted an Iraqi identity that encompasses all groups, thereby perpetuating conflict and circumventing national reconciliation. To be sure, identity in Iraq requires more nuance…
04 Jun 2013
Please Click on the Link below to download your copy of Mechanisms of Deteriorating Civil Liberties in Iraq.
NCCI’s brief provides an overview of what appear to be widespread, and often lethal, health effects from war contaminants in Iraq, namely Depleted Uranium (DU). Clearing DU-contaminated war remnants from areas across Iraq, as well as providing support to Iraqi victims of DU contamination, are critical issues for rebuilding this war-torn nation. NCCI published this paper with information and eye-witness testimony from doctors, researchers, NGOs leaders, and activists in the field who are struggling to respond to Iraq’s ostensibly growing health crisis and raise the international community’s awareness concerning apparent Iraqi DU victims’ plight.
30 Apr 2013

Perspectives on Moving Forward

Tuesday, 30 April 2013
(0 votes)
After a month of interviews highlighting many years of challenges, successes, and future prospects of NCCI, a final reflection on Iraq’s current situation and NCCI’s vision for future humanitarian work will hopefully serve to contextualize the purpose of many questions and answers. While it has been 10 years since the invasion of Iraq and the launch of the international humanitarian and developmental aid work in the country, it can be argued that little progress or stability has been witnessed in Iraq. It is without a doubt that most, if not all, gaps in Iraq are linked either directly or indirectly to the challenging political climate and the absence of a strong collective voice to represent the Iraqi community as a…
23 Apr 2013

NCCI’s Future and Wider Effect

Tuesday, 23 April 2013
(0 votes)
To mark its 10th anniversary, NCCI is publishing a series of 5 op-ed interviews during each week in April. The interviews will be held with individuals who have worked closely with NCCI for all or part of the past 10 years. The following interview focuses on NCCI’s future and impact to give readers an insight into how NCCI can better serve its network in the coming years and its wider impact on Iraq’s humanitarian space. The following includes interviews with:   NRC-Protection and Advocacy Advisor MCC-Iraq Program Coordinator DRC-Country Director Former NCCI Communications Coordinator (2005-2008) Former NCCI Executive Coordinator (2011-2012)     NCCI’s Future 1)                  As NNGOs gain capacity and improve efficacy, how can NCCI remain a relevant actor? NRC-Protection…
16 Apr 2013
To mark its 10th anniversary, NCCI is publishing a series of 5 op-ed interviews during each week in April. The interviews will be held with individuals who have worked closely with NCCI for all or part of the past 10 years. The following interview focuses on NCCI’s present to give readers an insight into challenges, successes, and initiatives, and it includes interviews with: Program Manager - Heartland Alliance, Iraq Country Director - International Rescue Committee, Iraq Program Manager - Nature Iraq 1) How did NCCI support and prepare its members for the withdrawal of U.S. troops? Program Manager - Heartland Alliance, Iraq: …I know that [the current Executive Coordinator] assisted me when I was with MCC with the design and…
09 Apr 2013

NCCI’s History (2005-2011)

Tuesday, 09 April 2013
(0 votes)
To mark its 10th anniversary, NCCI is publishing a series of 5 op-ed interviews during each week in April. The interviews will be held with individuals who have worked closely with NCCI for all or part of the past 10 years. The following interview focuses on NCCI’s more recent history to give readers an insight into challenges, successes, and initiatives, and it includes interviews with: Former Executive Coordinator (2005-2008) Former Field Coordinator (2008-2011) Former Executive Coordinator (2011-2012) Former Information and Communications Coordinator (2005-2008) Executive Coordinator (2012-present) 2005-2008 NCCI: In 2005, NCCI experienced a kind of reorganization, closing its Kuwait office, relocating its Baghdad support staff office to Amman, and rewriting its charter. a) What was the reason for this major…
02 Apr 2013

NCCI’s Early History

Tuesday, 02 April 2013
(0 votes)
To mark its 10th anniversary, NCCI is publishing a series of 5 op-ed interviews during each week in April. The interviews will be held with individuals who have worked closely with NCCI for all or part of the past 10 years. The following interview focuses on NCCI’s early history to give readers an insight into early challenges, successes, and initiatives, and it includes interviews with: Former Executive Coordinator (2005-2008) Board Member Former Field Coordinator (2003-2005) 2003-2004 NCCI: At the onset of the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, there were a few NGO coordination organizations, which included OCHA, Joint NGO Preparedness Initiative (JNEPI), and the International Council of Voluntary Agencies (ICVA). After the war, the civil-military cooperation (CIMIC) also began organizing humanitarian…
19 Mar 2013

The “Halabja” Genocide and Historical Memory

Tuesday, 19 March 2013
(2 votes)
On 16th March 1988, after two days of napalm and rocket bombardments, Saddam Hussein, along with Ali Hassan al-Majid, launched a chemical attack on the town of Halabja in southern Kurdistan. The five hour attack killed between 3,200 and 5,000 people, caused injury to between 7,000 and 10,000 others, most of whom were civilians. The attack marks the most severe and disastrous use chemical weapons in history, with many of the victims losing their lives to cancer or still suffering from its effects. While this incident can arguably be viewed as a continuation of Saddam’s “Anfal Campaign” (c. 1986-89), during which he targeted various minority communities in Iraq in order to “Arabize” the nation, it also marks a significant point…
05 Mar 2013

Ten Years of Evolving Civil Society Space in Iraq

Tuesday, 05 March 2013
(3 votes)
1- Civil society materialization Civil Society Organizations became commonplace in Iraq after 2003, when they intervened and began to play an important role in supporting the citizenry and improving life conditions by compensating for gaps in service provisions, while promoting democratic practices in a country that had experienced decades of dictatorship. Ten years after the civil society sector emerged, CSOs could boast important achievements. However, they still face major challenges to place themselves as an influential part of governance in Iraq. Limited capacity, limited access to neutral funds, and the distrust of the Iraqi Government, are among the elements weakening CSOs’ objectives. Moreover, a dubious legal environment, poor cooperation between Iraqi civil society and public authorities, as well as a…
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