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16 Apr 2013

NCCI’s Present (withdrawal through post-withdrawal)

  • Tuesday, 16 April 2013

To mark its 10th anniversary, NCCI is publishing a series of 5 op-ed interviews during each week in April. The interviews will be held with individuals who have worked closely with NCCI for all or part of the past 10 years. The following interview focuses on NCCI’s present to give readers an insight into challenges, successes, and initiatives, and it includes interviews with:

Program Manager - Heartland Alliance, Iraq

Country Director - International Rescue Committee, Iraq

Program Manager - Nature Iraq

 

1)                  How did NCCI support and prepare its members for the withdrawal of U.S. troops?

Program Manager - Heartland Alliance, Iraq: …I know that [the current Executive Coordinator] assisted me when I was with MCC with the design and dissemination of a questionnaire to local NGOs on their needs upon the withdrawal of the US troops.  And he traveled to Washington DC to talk to US legislators about NGO needs.  I have not yet seen the final documents from that effort. 

Executive Coordinator (2012-present): The general perception among NGOs community was no huge change in the security and political situation happen and result a huge change in the humanitarian situation in term of improvement or deterioration that need special response. However, the security situation was affected by the withdraw and NCCI the security coordination was strengthened by the creation of the security working group.  

 

2)            How was coordination, advocacy, and information sharing affected by the withdrawal?

Country Director - International Rescue Committee, Iraq: These may have become a little more challenging as the security situation has deteriorated since withdrawal, however, not substantially.

Executive Coordinator (2012-present): As the security situation was became more tense after the withdrawal, coordination (including info sharing) and advocacy was more difficult than before. Access to the international zone (also known as the green zone) became more difficult after the withdrawal and UN coordination was based inside the IZ. More efforts were needed to maintain coordination mechanisms. 

 

3)            What is the biggest challenge facing NCCI’s network today and how can it be overcome?

Program Manager - Heartland Alliance, Iraq: Capacity building for smaller NGOs in terms of administration, paperwork, grant writing and program management is a big need.  The money is harder to come by now that the US and other governments have reduced funding to Iraq.  It seems time that NGOs could work together more effectively. 

Also, at a recent membership meeting, I felt that folks were attending for their own benefit, rather than for the good of a network body.  This could also be addressed with capacity building.   

[Additionally], in the KRG we need the NGO registration forms in English and some help completing them.  I believe they are not available yet.  I would also like to be better linked to the NGO coordinating body in the KRG government. I intend to ask [the NCCI Erbil office] to assist Heartland with that.  

I wonder if NGOs in the KRG region should have a more sustainable coordination mechanism with local NCCI field officers.  Like monthly meetings on various topics in each governorate.   

Program Manager - Nature Iraq: Broadening NGO involvement in the network and advocating for NGOs rights with the Iraqi government.

 

4)            How does Iraq’s coordination setting differ in the KRG and the centrally controlled governorates? And how does NCCI’s strategy differ in the two regions?  

Country Director - International Rescue Committee, Iraq: Coordination is somewhat easier in KRG because movement is easier. However, there is some challenge because INGO offices are split between [Sulymaniyah] and [Erbil].

Program Manager - Nature Iraq: …Things seem to be simply easier to do/accomplish in the KRG

 

5)            NCCI’s Executive Coordinator recently relocated from Amman to Baghdad. What are the advantages and disadvantages (if any) to NCCI’s members and Iraqi NNGOs as a whole?

Program Manager - Heartland Alliance, Iraq: Even better, the Exec Coordinator is an Iraqi.   Unfortunately, the work load to cover the entire country for this one person is immense whether in Amman or Baghdad.  Is there some way that those duties could be spread across more staff - Empowering them to do more[?]   It might be beneficial to have a KRG Director?   

Country Director - International Rescue Committee, Iraq: The advantages are that is it much easier to access the EC and the EC has greater access to partner NGOs.

Program Manager - Nature Iraq: If you are asking about the advantages and disadvantages to this move, I think it is better for NNGOs but may make things somewhat more difficult for coordinating with international organizations and agencies that work out of Amman and not Baghdad.

Executive Coordinator (2012-present): I believe re-locating the EC to Baghdad is an important step towards strengthening the field coordination since the majority of humanitarian actors were re-located to Iraq. However, re-locating the NCCI EC to Baghdad should be combined with strengthening NCCI’s presence in the northern and southern parts of the country, as not all the major actors are based in Baghdad, as was the case with Amman.    

 

6)            What has been the general response of the Iraqi public (excluding NGOs) to NCCI’s presence? 

Program Manager - Nature Iraq: I can only talk from the perspective of the KRG and I don't think that the general public is very much aware of NCCI (but I'm not a Kurdish speaker and can't be sure of this). But is that a stated goal of NCCI?  Its clients are NGOs, not specifically the Iraqi public.  I do think that NCCI is helping NNGOs to become more professional so that these groups will interact with the Iraqi public in a professional and positive way.

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