In the aftermath of the sudden and rapid advance of Daesh through central parts of Iraq in summer 2014, a humanitarian crisis of significant proportion remains. As Daesh continues to consolidate its control over western parts of the country, a counter-insurgency operation has been led by the government and other regional and international forces. Hundreds of thousands have fled their homes in three mass displacements, and more are expected to do so as efforts are made to retake cities and towns in the Anbar and Ninewa governorates. Displaced families have found safety in villages, towns and cities throughout the country, welcomed generously by communities and supported by the Government of Iraq and the Kurdistan Regional Government (KRG). Whilst more than…
Rapid Assessment of Explosive Remnants of War (ERW) Contamination in Northern Ninewah Governorate While displaced persons fleeing violence may have to enter/transit areas of contamination pre-dating the current conflict, a safe return to places or origin formerly under IS control is also threatened by an increase in the type and scope of ERW contamination. In particular, IS‟s widespread use of victim operated improvised explosive devices (IEDs) is posing a threat to civilians and hampering a safe returns process to areas secured by the security forces. Thousands of people spontaneously returning to their home locations face the threat of injury and death due to contamination and damage resulting from the conflict. Additionally, with no systematically collected information on the extent of…
As Mercy Corps' three year Broadening Participation through Civil Society program comes to an end, Mercy Corps is pleased to share the results of our endline survey, which surveyed and analyzed the views of over 5,000 Iraqi citizens on the state of the country, civic participation and responsibility, formal and informal justice/governance systems, and the future of civil society in Iraq. The report summary can be found in English, Kurdish, and Arabic.
On 24th November 2015, Medair conducted a health facility assessment in three health facilities in the Snuny Sub-district of Sinjar, Ninewa Governorate. This was done as a follow up to a rapid multi-sector needs assessment conducted by Medair on 5th-7th November of conflict-affected households in informal settlements on Sinjar Mountain. Priority needs identified by the population at that time were food security and access to health services, hence the follow up health facility assessment. Please find the complete needs assesment report attached below.
On November 5-7th, a rapid multi-sector needs assessment (RNA) was conducted of conflict-affected households living among informal settlements on Sinjar Mountain. The assessment teams identified Food Security and access to Health Services as the two highest priority unmet needs from respondents across four separate locations assessed. In the context of the subsequent military campaign to recapture Sinjar city, and looking at both the current and projected needs from an increasing population in the Snuny Sub-District, Medair recommends immediate Health interventions to address critical gaps in service. Specifically, Medair has identified opportunities, with support from the Directorate of Health-Ninewa (DoH-Ninewa), to operate mobile medical units to support current health posts on Sinjar Mountain and assist with the rehabilitation of Primary Health…
10 Nov 2015
Iraqi Telemedicine Center   Overview The Iraqi Telemedicine Center (ITC) is the first Iraqi telemedicine initiative, founded in 2014 by Mercy Hands for Humanitarian Aid. The idea of establishing the center came as a result of the reality of healthcare sector and the humanitarian crises in Iraq and the whole region. The main problems the healthcare sector in Iraq suffers from are: 1) Shortage in healthcare personnel and medical specialties; 2) Poor healthcare infrastructure; 3) Difficulties to access physicians, clinics, and hospitals either due to long distance, security concerns, lack of transportation means, or time constraint; 4) The high cost of healthcare services and limited purchase power of the patients; and 5) In times of humanitarian crises, the aforementioned problems…
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